Archive for the ‘canal’ Category

Ara Canal Ride

April 16, 2017

I had a great ride today that was about as long I could currently handle. It wasn’t very long!

I took my bike on the subway to Ara Canal, north of us, that runs alongside the Han River. It is the start for the 4-rivers paths which apparently would take me from the mouth of the Han River to the mouth of the Nakdong River. It is a little neat that I have lived at both places.

Anyway, i got off the subway at Gyeyang. There are many bike rental places on the route including this one right at Gyeyang Station.

Get ready for a lot of photos of signs. They seem to be the easiest way for me to include distance information and maps.

On the way west, I passed this structure on the other side of the river.

I returned east on the other side so stopped at it to rest.

A friend is planning a bike hike on the 4-rivers path and plans to camp. This looks like an ‘official’ camping area.

At the west end, I could have gone a little further but stopped at this open area.  There were a few rowers out.

Props to the local subways with bike racks in the first cars!

I had trouble connecting on Map My Walk so this map starts after I had gone around halfway west. It, uh, also includes some of my subway trip at the end -if you can see I managed 54km/h, it wasn’t by pedalling.

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Unnecessary canals

March 2, 2014

I used an ocean of pixels in attacking Lee Myoung Bak’s plan for a canal from Incheon up the Han River to Gangwondo and across to the Nakdong River (which also starts in Gangwon Province) and south to Busan.  The whole canal idea was ridiculous; the ocean offers a open water route between Incheon or Seoul and Busan and there are never traffic jams or delays for locks to fill and empty.  See here and here if you are interested.

A new canal is in the news, and although not in Korea, it might be similarly redundant.  Nicaragua may soon get a canal to compete with Panama’s.

The environmental impacts could be considerable.

A final route for the canal has not yet been announced, but the proposed routes pass through Lake Nicaragua, which covers about six times the area of Los Angeles and is Central America’s largest lake.

The lake is a major source of drinking water and irrigation, and home to rare freshwater sharks and other fish of commercial and scientific value, Huete-Pérez and Meyer say. The forest around it is home to howler monkeys, tapirs, jaguars, and countless tropical birds–not to mention several groups of indigenous people (some of whom have challenged the project in court, so far to no avail).

I’m a citizen of the world and benefit from international commerce.  I know nothing about the environmental impact of either Central American canal but I know I benefit from the one that currently exists.  It will be interesting to see what arguments are made against the proposed new canal and how the current one succeeds or fails on those aspects.